Do childhood development programs help children living in conflict and crisis settings?

Millions of young children living in conditions of war, disaster, and displacement are at increased risk for developmental difficulties that can follow them throughout their lives. A new Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences article reviews what’s known about the effectiveness of early childhood development programs in humanitarian settings and present a framework and recommendations for future research.

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Earth & Climate 

Opportunity to restore abundance to Hawaiian reef fisheries

Unsustainable fishing has depleted coastal fisheries worldwide, threatening food security and cultural identity for many coastal and island communities, including in Hawai’i. A recently published study, led by researchers at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa (UH Manoa), identified areas in the Hawaiian Islands that would provide the greatest increase in coastal fishery stocks, if effectively managed.

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Weird World 

Scientists can predict which storks will migrate to Africa in autumn and which will remain in Europe

For little Louis, it is the most exciting day of his life: just six or seven weeks ago, the young stork came into the world on a birch tree in Radolfzell on Lake Constance. Up to this day in June 2014, he has only known his parents and three siblings. But suddenly strange beings have appeared at the nest and are holding the four small white storks captive. They are Andrea Flack and Wolfgang Fiedler of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and the University of Konstanz. In the coming years, the scientists will learn from Louis and other young storks that, on their migrations south, storks follow other storks who are particularly good at exploiting thermals, allowing them to flap their wings as little as possible as they fly. The efficient fliers migrate to West Africa, while the others spend the winter in southern Europe. From their data, the researchers can tell which storks will fly where just ten minutes after the birds take off.

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